Angela Creese
Angela Creese

Angela Creese is professor of educational linguistics in the School of Education at the University of Birmingham. Her research and teaching cross references anthropology, linguistics and education. She uses ethnography to investigate ideologies and interactions in educational and other social settings. Her research publications cover urban multilingualism, language ecology, multilingual ethnography, language education and social identities. She teaches research methods, sociolinguistics and educational linguistics.

Abstract

This paper explores language learning opportunities in non-classroom based environments, and considers the personal and collective gain not only for the language learner but for wider society. Taking 'repetition' as an analytical starting point, the paper draws on both sociolinguistics and second language acquisition literature to consider the cognitive and social benefits for individual and societal learning. I present several interactional transcripts between strangers in different city contexts, and explore their language learning and teaching potential.  Overall I argue such language teaching and learning encounters provide information particularly germane in contexts of social and linguistic diversity where social differences are multiple but also commonplace.